Monthly Archives: July 2012

freebsd

I’ve started looking at FreeBSD at work this week, because I was reading some blog posts about how MySQL performs well on a combination of that and ZFS together.  I haven’t gotten around to getting ZFS setup yet, but I have been looking into FreeBSD as an OS a lot, and so far, I like it.

This makes the second distro in the past year that I’ve really started to seriously look into, the other one being Ubuntu.  I’m still trying to wrap my head around the whole FreeBSD design structure and philosophy, and for now I’m having a hard time summing it up.  In my mind, it kind of feels like a mashup of functionality between Gentoo and Ubuntu.  I like that there is a set group of packages that are always there, kind of like Ubuntu, but that you can compile everything from source, like Gentoo.

What has really surprised me is how quickly I’ve been able to pick it up, understand it, and already work on getting an install up and running.  I think that having patience is probably the primary reason there.  Figuring out how things work hasn’t really been that hard, but I say that because of past Linux experience that has helped me figure out where to look for answers more easily.  That is, when I get stuck on something, I can usually figure it out just by guessing or poking around with little effort.

Years ago, if I would have looked at any BSD, I would have been asking “why?”  I still don’t know why I’m looking at it, other than I believe it’s not a good idea to put all your eggs in one basket.  At work we already support CentOS, Gentoo and Ubuntu, and it’d be awesome to add FreeBSD to the list.

I’m really enjoying it so far.  It’s easy to install packages using the ports system.  I tried going the route of binary packages at first, but that wasn’t working out so well for me.  Then I tried mixing ports and packages, and that wasn’t doing too great either, so I switched to just using ports for now.

The only thing I don’t like so far is how it’s kind of hard to find what I’m looking for.  I totally chalk that up to me being a noob, and not as any real flaw of the distro or it’s documentation — I just don’t know where to look yet.  Fortunately, ‘whereis’ has saved me a lot of time.

The system seems familiar enough and easy to use for me, coming from a Linux background.  In fact, I really can’t find many differences.  The things I have noticed are that it uses much less memory, even on old underpowered boxes, and that it is relatively quick out of the box.  I never would have guessed that.

I’m curious to see how ZFS integrates into the system, if at all.  I like the filesystem, and it’s feature set, but that’s about it for now (I got to play with it a bit as we had a FreeNAS install for a few months).  If it’s a major pain to integrate it, I’m probably not going to push for it right now — I’m content with riding out the learning curve until I feel more comfortable with the system.

So, all in all, it’s cool to find something different, that doesn’t feel too different, but still lets me get my head in there and figure out something new.

If you guys know of any killer apps to use on here, let me know.  I’m kind of wishing I had an easier way to install stuff using ports aside from tromping through /usr/ports manually looking for package names.

8 Comments

Filed under Computers

what i’m reading: “real boys”

Summer is rough for me.  I take fewer classes, I have lots more free time, and things are generally a lot less unstructured.  This means my life is full of chaos.

One thing I’ve noticed about school, recently, is that if I’m not taking any psychology courses, I become indifferent about working towards a degree.  It’s hard slogging through generals for any student, but in my case, where there’s limited amounts of time and money to spend on pursuing an education, it just feels like it’s not worth the hassle.

So, summer is a little rougher for me, and I’m looking forward to Fall and Spring semesters again.

In the meantime, and I’ve been doing this for awhile, I always have one book about psychology or counseling that I’m reading.  Right now, I’m making my way through a great book called “Real Boys.”

If I could summarize the book, it’s basically documenting the effects of boys not expressing their feelings.  I was going to expound on that, but that’s just about how it goes.  I also use the term ‘boys’ here from the author’s context, not mine. He tends to cover a large age group, from about eight to sixteen.

Flipping it open tonight, the page I started on perfectly expressed the “why” I want to work with youth so much — or, that is, the kinds of problems I want to encounter and help people out with:

When boys become hardened, they become willing to endure emotional and physical pain–even to risk their lives–if it means winning the approval of their peers.  Boys can become so thoroughly hardened that they literally anesthetize themselves against the pain they must cope with.  And they are often left unsupervised at an earlier age than girls and are usually discouraged by adults from engaging in help-seeking behaviors at their time of greatest vulnerability or need, boys learn to remain silent despite their suffering.

Incredibly sad commentary, of course, but also accurate.

I suppose that the solution could be summed up in “love your kids,” but what I see happening is that culture is a strong influence of how to love them — when to cut them loose, when to have them “man up,” and so on.  Culture is a poor guide for determining personal milestones.

I’ve been learning more about counseling and people not just with what I read, but as I casually observe people and realize how simple things are.  The realization is dawning on me that humans are alike emotionally, wanting the same basics subsets of love and caring: respect, communication, validation, correction and instruction.  Things that people do that are “weird” or “out there” are most times going to be tied back to some fundamental need that is unaddressed.  And in the cases where that is the case, there can be a check for internal chemical imbalances (depression, schizophrenia, OCD, mood disorders etc.) where medication can do a lot of good in providing more stability.

On a personal level, not an academic one, from helping out others, I’ve noticed how important it is that people have someone that will look them in the eye and listen to them.  I’ve noticed that just looking at someone directly often times can slightly startle someone, since it is so unexpected.  I’ve seen though, how talking calmly and directly to someone will both relax them and engender some trust.  People just want to be listened to.

Anyway, it’s all fascinating stuff, and I love reading up on it, and discovering new things.  In a lot of ways, I’m finding that counseling is based on really simple principles of caring and communicating.

1 Comment

Filed under Psychology