Monthly Archives: September 2012

the gospel of simplicity

I had an interesting thought tonight.  “Lord, I want to join the battle.”  I love working with youth, talking to them, helping them out the best I can.  The thing that worries the most is not the decisions that they’ll make, but rather that I haven’t prepared myself enough.  I want to be spiritually ready all the time, to be up to any challenge that comes my way.  That’s a pretty tall order.  When I feel like I need to reach that lofty goal, I start to think of big ways to change my life, and how to get there amazingly fast.

What I’m having to learn over and over is that the the gospel is not about moments of energy and excitement.  It’s not big projects that need to be undertaken, or major changes to my schedule.  It’s not zealotry or extreme attitudes.  Instead, it’s about making a decision, day by day, to follow Christ.

Like many Christians, I wear a cross.  It’s a necklace that I put on every morning before I head out for the day.  I don’t have to put it on, but as I do, it’s a really personal reminder that I’m making a choice — that, yes, this is something I want to do, and take it upon myself willingly.  And what’s cool is that I have to make that decision every day — not as a group, but individually.  Every morning I make the choice.

I still have the habit of wanting to jump into things with full heart and spirit, and at times get almost a patriotic pledge to do more.  I think of big changes I can make so that I’m somehow getting more spirituality into my life.  It starts to become a project, some huge overreaching goal that I can build with lots of effort and work.  This leads problem that I will start to think there is something “special” out there that I should be doing, to find that extra measure of spiritual input.  Big goals require big commitments, which leads to big changes.  Rip out all the old stuff, and put in the new.  Everything old must go. There’s some method out there to tap this great well of spiritual power that I haven’t found yet, some secret sauce that the Lord will reveal to me as I push with so much effort and drive.

However, that is going about it the wrong way.  I love how the Lord puts things into perspective.  From Matthew 24:

26. Wherefore if they shall say unto you, Behold, he is in the desert; go not forth: behold, he is in the secret chambers; believe it not.

There are no secret angles, no shortcuts, no hidden mysteries for only a select few to find.  I do not need to go out into the desert, something that would take a lot of resources and dedication — somewhere only a few could go if they had the right equipment, stamina, and drive.

Instead, He has made it clear that it is the basic principles of the gospel, that all men, women and children can exercise, where they are.  Consider, for example, taking the basics to a higher level over time as you make it a part of your life.

Prayer is the simple act of talking to God.  Reading the scriptures is having God talk to me.  Fasting teaches self-control.  Like any skill, I can improve, and do better over time.  Instead of saying token prayers, I can learn how to calmly and quietly express my soul to God, and know that he hears.  Instead of reading the scriptures out of a sense of duty and daily obligation, I can study them and look more closely, trying to understand God’s will.

The basics, if expanded on, can bring about great results.  I know that that’s true, because as I decrease or increase in those simple things, I can notice a difference.

My crazy mind still likes to flirt with the idea that there is some great knowledge that I need to acquire before I can commit.  A nebulous mass of content that I must completely understand before I can move forward.

Again, the Lord puts things into perspective, making it so much simpler:

13. Enter ye in at the strait gate: for wide is the gate, and broad is the way, that leadeth to destruction, and many there be which go in thereat:
14. Because strait is the gate, and narrow is the way, which leadeth unto life, and few there be that find it.

The way that I read this is that my task  is to enter into the gate that leads unto eternal life.  He doesn’t say anything about winning the race, or how fast I should be going, or how soon I need to get there.  At the very beginning, He just wants me to go in the right direction.

It’s not hard to make that choice, but it’s hard for me to understand and accept that it’s so simple.  It really is, though, and when I think about how easy it is, I realize that it’s something I can do.  And the Holy Ghost confirms to me that it is true.  I like the Lord’s way much better than mine.

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simpsons treehouse of horror buying guide

Note: I found this in my drafts of old posts, and this one never got published.  I wrote it in October of 2011, so the list may have changed a bit since then.

For those of you who know me, I really don’t like TV or movies with violence or gore in them. Yet, somehow, I am totally fascinated by them. Oddly enough, I’ll read all about horror movies and slasher flicks sometimes, and never watch them. I think part of the reason is I get *really* scared by them. Anyway. I especially love the Simpsons Treehouse of Horror episodes, because they are just awesome, and not as hardcore.

I promised my little brother that I’d get some for Halloween for us to watch. I don’t think he’s seen any of them. Edit: I showed him some last year. :)

Being the collector type that I am, I did some research, and lo and behold, FOX has released these in the most backwards incomplete way possible. In short, of the 21 seasons available to buy of the Simpsons, 17 of them are available to purchase, either through Amazon Video or DVD.

What’s crazy is that while Amazon Video sells them in “seasons”, they are really just totally random episodes thrown together. On top of that, the one DVD that is available is also episodes from random seasons, and two of them crossover with what is packaged in season 2 on Amazon Video. The rest, you can buy individually from the Simpsons seasons on Amazon Video.

It’s confusing, I know, but here’s how they released them:

Treehouse of Horror – Season One:
1990 I
1993 IV
1996 VII
1999 X
2002 XIII
2005 XVI

Treehouse of Horror – Season Two:
1991 II
1994 V
1997 VIII
2000 XI
2003 XIV
2006 XVII

Treehouse of Horror – DVD:
1994 V
1995 VI
1996 VII
2001 XII

So, for the crazy completist in your life, I’ve organized them in correct chronological order, with the link of how to buy them. Ultimately, you’re going to have to get them all this way, both seasons plus the DVD, regardless of crossover, if you want the most complete amount of episodes.

01: ssn1
02: ssn2
03: N/A
04: ssn1
05: ssn2, DVD
06: ssn2, DVD
07: DVD
08: ssn2
09: N/A
10: ssn1
11: ssn2
12: DVD
13: ssn1
14: ssn2
15: N/A
16: ssn1
17: ssn2
18: N/A
19: indy
20: indy
21: indy

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blogs

So, I’ve realized that I made a mistake in splitting out this blog into two more (my working with teenagers one and my scriptures one).  The reason being that, the other two felt like I had to have these nicely crafted blog posts put together.  That kinda sucks.  It puts pressure on me to come up with something nice, and more importantly, it doesn’t allow me to explore at all.  In other words, make mistakes, and talk about stuff I’m researching versus delivering a final draft.

I think I’m gonna retain my other two blogs, but just put revised posts there, and go back to the old way here.

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gentoo, openrc, apache and monit – proper starting and stopping

I regularly use monit to monitor services and restart them if needed (and possible).  An issue I’ve run into though with Gentoo is that openrc doesn’t act as I expect it to.  openrc keeps it’s own record of the state of a service, and doesn’t look at the actual PID to see if it’s running or not.  In this post, I’m talking about apache.

For context, it’s necessary to share what my monit configuration looks like for apache.  It’s just a simple ‘start’ for startup and ‘stop’ command for shutdown:

check process apache with pidfile /var/run/apache2.pid start program = “/etc/init.d/apache2 start” with timeout 60 seconds stop program = “/etc/init.d/apache2 stop”

When apache gets started, there are two things that happen on the system: openrc flags it as started, and apache creates a PID file.

The problem I run into is when apache dies for whatever reason, unexpectedly.  Monit will notice that the PID doesn’t exist anymore, and try to restart it, using openrc.  This is where things start to go wrong.

To illustrate what happens, I’ll duplicate the scenario by running the command myself.  Here’s openrc starting it, me killing it manually, then openrc trying to start it back up using ‘start’.

# /etc/init.d/apache2 start
# pkill apache2
# /etc/init.d/apache2 status
* status: crashed
# /etc/init.d/apache2 start
* WARNING: apache2 has already been started

You can see that ‘status’ properly returns that it has crashed, but when running ‘start’, it thinks otherwise.  So, even though an openrc status check reports that it’s dead, when running ‘start’ it only checks it’s own internal status to determine it’s status.

This gets a little weirder in that if I run ‘stop’, the init script will recognize that the process is not running, and reset’s openrc’s status to stopped.  That is actually a good thing, and so it makes running ‘stop’ a reliable command.

Resuming the same state as above, here’s what happens when I run ‘stop’:

# /etc/init.d/apache2 stop
* apache2 not running (no pid file)

Now if I run it again, it checks both the process and the openrc status, and gives a different message, the same one it would as if it was already stopped.

# /etc/init.d/apache2 stop
* WARNING: apache2 is already stopped

So, the problem this creates for me is that if a process has died, monit will not run the stop command, because it’s already dead, and there’s no reason to run it.  It will run ‘start’, which will insist that it’s already running.  Monit (depending on your configuration) will try a few more times, and then just give up completely, leaving your process completely dead.

The solution I’m using is that I will tell monit to run ‘restart’ as the start command, instead of ‘start’.  The reason for this is because restart doesn’t care if it’s stopped or started, it will successfully get it started again.

I’ll repeat my original test case, to demonstrate how this works:

# /etc/init.d/apache2 start
# pkill apache2
# /etc/init.d/apache2 status
* status: crashed
# /etc/init.d/apache2 restart
* apache2 not running (no pid file)
* Starting apache2 …

I don’t know if my expecations of openrc are wrong or not, but it seems to me like it relies on it’s internal status in some cases instead of seeing if the actual process is running.  Monit takes on that responsibility, of course, so it’s good to have multiple things working together, but I wish openrc was doing a bit more strict checking.

I don’t know how to fix it, either.  openrc has arguments for displaying debug and verbose output.  It will display messages on the first run, but not the second, so I don’t know where it’s calling stuff.

# /etc/init.d/apache2 -d -v start
<lots of output>
# /etc/init.d/apache2 -d -v start
* WARNING: apache2 has already been started

No extra output on the second one.  Is this even a ‘problem’ that should be fixed, or not?  That’s kinda where I’m at right now, and just tweaking my monit configuration so it works for me.

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